Skip to main content
Loading...

Ambassador Bridge

Canada Border Services Agency reveals radio frequency identification at border

Traveling to Canada? Here’s what’s new

The Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) announced today that radio frequency identification (RFID) at select land crossings in Ontario are fully operational. This means that RFID chips and readers will allow for RFID-enabled travel documents to be read from a distance, prior to a vehicle’s arrival at the primary inspection booth. 

One of the land crossings is the Ambassador Bridge to Windsor, ON. 

Some quick facts about RFID from the Government of Canada’s website:

  • RFID technology is the wireless, non-contact use of radio frequency electromagnetic fields to transfer data, for the purposes of automatically identifying and tracking tags attached to objects.
  • The RFID chip and reader allow for RFID-enabled travel documents to be read and displayed from a distance, prior to a vehicle’s arrival at the primary inspection booth. 
  • RFID-enabled lanes are regular lanes that all travellers can use, with or without RFID-enabled travel documents.

No personal information is stored on the RFID chip.

Canadian Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness Ralph Goodale says that “Adding radio frequency identification technology to the CBSA’s suite of tools will help streamline traveller processing and improve border security measures. It is yet another way in which we are making use of technology to help border services officers ensure the border is efficient and secure.”

More information here.

 

Image credit: Flickr/Cody Smith